The Sunday List (14)

{Wat Phra Singh in Chiang Mai, Thailand.
Photo was taken on Makha Bucha or February Full Moon Festival}

listening
1. Adele’s Albums 19 and 21
You can watch the video for Make You Feel My Love here.

  1. Debut album Sigh No More by Mumford and Sons (Thanks to Megan for the recommendation!)
    Check out the video for The Cave here.

  2. Dog Days Are Over – the Glee Cast Version!

  3. Alanis Morissette’s most recent album Flavors of Entanglement. Here’s the video for Not As We.

  4. Songs For Japan
    If you are looking for a cool way to donate money to Japan, this album is listed on the home page of i-tunes. $9.99 buys you songs from 38 different artists including Bob Dylan, Katy Perry, Sting, U2, Elton John, Bruno Mars, Michael Buble, and Sade.

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p>reading
1. I’ll Never Be French (no matter what I do) by Mark Greenside

  1. The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World’s Most Glorious – and Perplexing – City by David Lebovitz
  2. Halfway to Each Other: How a Year in Italy Brought Our Family Home by Susan Pohlman

  3. A Week at the Airport by Alain De Botton

watching
1. Bones

  1. Treme (New Orleans in the days right after Katrina. John Goodman is amazing.)
  2. American Idol (We are loving new judges Steven Tyler and Jennifer Lopez)

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p>quoting
“I mean – here I am in this sacred place of study in the middle of India, and all I can think about is my ex-boyfriend? What am I, in eighth grade?

And then I remember a story my friend Deborah the psychologist told me once. Back in the 1980s, she was asked by the city of Philadelphia if she could volunteer to offer psychological counseling to a group of Cambodian refugees who had recently arrived in the city. These Cambodians had suffered the worst of what humans can inflict on each other – genocide, rape, torture, starvation, the murder of their relatives before their eyes, then long years in refugee camps and dangerous boat trips to the West where people died and corpses were fed to sharks – what could Deborah offer these people in terms of help? How could she possibly relate to their suffering?

“But don’t you know,” Deborah reported to me, “what all these people wanted to talk about, once they could see a counselor?”

It was all: ‘I met this guy when I was living in the refugee camp, and we fell in love. I thought he really loved me, but then we were separated on different boats, and he took up with my cousin. Now he’s married to her, but he says he really loves me, and he keeps calling me, and I know I should tell him to go away, but I still love him and I can’t stop thinking about him. And I don’t know what to do…’

This is what we are like. Collectively, as a species, this is our emotional landscape.”

Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

What cool art are you currently listening to, reading, watching and quoting? Please share!

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